RURAL

NEWS

A TREE IS FOR LIFE - NOT JUST FOR CHRISTMAS!2018-10-19
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When you buy your Christmas tree this year, please also send some festive cheer to deprived families in Southern Africa by paying for a disadvantaged Zimbabwean community to plant one.

Around 8.25 million real Christmas trees are sold annually in the UK. On average each will have taken 11 years to grow, yet only 1-in-10 are recycled for composting and wood chipping. (continues)

EXCITED ABOUT TREES2016-02-05
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Following delays caused by the wait for rain and the need to avoid clashing with political party meetings, we have now successfully helped to plant three new woodlots in the past week.

Our Senior Community Development Worker, Robert writes, "Now that news has travelled about what we are doing, we are so overwhelmed by requests for more trees. (continues)

NATIONAL TREE WEEK2015-12-04
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This week is National Tree Week. While many of us in the UK will soon be buying a Christmas tree, or may already have done so, villagers in Zimbabwe have been planting trees.

Far more than just a winter decoration, the vast majority of which will end up being sent to landfill sites, the trees in Zimbabwe will serve a whole range of useful purposes, including:

Provide shade Prevent soil erosion Wood for fire and building (can be 'harvested' whilst the 'mother' tree continues to grow) Make very long, straight and strong multipurpose poles Fibre used for tying building structures Encourage return of wildlife Fruit suitable for human consumption Leaves, bark and roots useful for medicinal purposes Flowers attract lots of bees and encourage honey production

So, please invest in the future by helping Zimbabwe villagers to invest in trees by texting "SEED77 '10" to 70070 or donating online. (continues)

MUREHWA GARDEN SHOW2015-10-16
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The garden show almost had to be postponed (again) as there was yet another political event in the same area, but it finally happened last week. The theme this year was 'Start Small, Grow Big'.

We had invited several companies in the farming industry to participate in the day's events, including Seed-Co, Klein Karoo, National Tested Seeds (NTS), ZFC (Zimbabwe fertilizer company) and Omnia (another fertilizer company), some of whom contributed prizes for the show. (continues)

SIGN OF THE TIMES2015-08-14
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76-year-old Conrad is another of SEED's successful smallholders. Previously written off by younger members of the community, he is now showing them how to make the most of what resources and skills they do possess.

Conrad recently observed, "I'm encouraged that even though I never went to school, I'm seeing some young university graduates coming to buy fruit and vegetables from my garden. (continues)

SHOWCASING SUCCESS2015-07-24
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The smallholders in Murehwa are looking forward to a bumper harvest. The local Agricultural Officer recently joined them for a tour of their fields and was impressed at both the health of their crops and the innovative ways they have used local resources as affordable substitutes for otherwise expensive materials, such as grass fencing to prevent damage caused by stray animals. (continues)

TRANSFORMING LIVES2015-07-03
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The new group of smallholders that SEED's community development workers have been working alongside now have the confidence and composure to demonstrate to other would-be market gardeners the knowledge which they have acquired so far.

Contrary to the expectations of many in the community, many of the older members in the group mastered the concepts so well that they are doing much better than the younger members and are now serving as local role models. (continues)

THE CURRENT PLIGHT OF ZIMBABWE2015-05-12
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SEED trustee and co-founder Jackson Nazombe visited Zimbabwe last month. These are his reflections.

My overview of the situation in Zimbabwe from my visit is slightly depressing. The quality of life is hugely deteriorated compared to last year. Many of my friends and relations had not been paid for upwards of 14 months. (continues)

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